Solstice Inspired

It takes 12 moon cycles for our little planet to cycle once around the sun. The oldest human celebrations known have celebrated that feat quarterly – two Solstices and two Equinoxes. These are celebrations of gratitude that the sun “returns”.

Of course we all know the sun doesn’t go anywhere, we’re the ones moving about, but our ancestors weren’t so sure. Summer Solstice is the precise moment when the tilt of the earth on its axis puts the Northern hemisphere as close to the sun as it’s going to be, and the Southern Hemisphere the furthest (Winter Solstice there). In December the roles reverse.

Ra (Egyptian), Lord Surya (Hindu), Helios (Greek), Khors (Slavic), Sunna (Nordic), Sol (Roman), are but a few of the deity names given to the sun, thought to either be a god, or ruled by a god.

Throughout time, no matter how crazy we’re behaving here on our little spaceship, the sun has been constant, while life here is ever-changing. No wonder it has been consistently cerebrated!

☀️Solstice cheer!

past Summer Solstice post:

Evening Light & Tagore On This Solistice Eve

 

Rose therapy

 

Been six weeks since I broke my wrist. I lost some opportunities for harvesting certain medicinal plants I like to use that peaked during that time period, but today I celebrated new hand movement by harvesting roses for drying and making rose petal infused honey.

Yesterday I got the last of the three pins out that held the bone together while it started to heal. There’s still swelling, pain and a recovery road ahead to regain use of my wrist and strengthen my hand, but the surgeon was impressed. I was ahead of schedule on bone regeneration.

He’s a cool doc, he knows nutritional supplements help, but he doesn’t know the effects plant medicine has on bone healing and tissue recover. The first major task for the fingers on my weaken right hand today was pulling the silky smooth petals off while I inhaled the strong rose fragrance. Excellent rehab therapy!🌹

Wish I could post here the heady intoxication of sitting with a basket  full of scented roses! If you harvest your own, find full body scented ones, old bush roses are often the best, that are free of all sprays, road pollution etc, and harvest in the morning, choosing the ones freshly opened.

The Doctrine of Signatures states plants resembling certain body parts can be used to heal those body parts. What do you think? Can roses, the flower of love, with its heart shaped petals, heal hearts? Roses, which are astringent, do have medicinal properties, but I’d say it’s the aromatherapy that gladdens a sad heart!

So what is good for bone building?

Many vitamins and minerals are needed for bone growth.  Calcium, magnesium, boron, vitamin D 2, folate, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, vitamin K and vitamins B2 and B6, are primary ones.

A number of herbs help with bone growth. Good ones are stinging nettle, horsetail, oatstraw, and Solomon’s Seal.  Because I want to take a lot and know they  are high quality herbs, I take the herbs in capsule form from a company that makes excellent products and drink a cold infusion tea of Solomon’s Seal daily.  I also used a comfrey and plantain salve on my arm above and below the brace for several weeks, and consulted with a traditional homeopathic practitioner for the right homeopathic remedies for my healing. Comfrey, called knit bone, will heal bones very well, there is some concern of it’s affect on liver so using topically is safest.

More about roses:

Rose Survivors